Serena Williams keen to ‘move on’ from US Open row

first_imgView comments Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Tennis queen Osaka a role model, says ‘Indian’ Miss Japan MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 08: Serena Williams of the United States reacts during her Women’s Singles finals match against Naomi Osaka of Japan on Day Thirteen of the 2018 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2018 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. Elsa/Getty Images/AFPSerena Williams says she is trying to “move on” from the meltdown that overshadowed her US Open final loss but remains perplexed at her coach’s admission he illegally signalled to her.The 23-time Grand Slam champion lost the decider in straight sets to Japan’s Naomi Osaka after a fiery confrontation with chair umpire Carlos Ramos that she later blamed on sexism.ADVERTISEMENT Williams called Ramos a “thief” and a “liar” in a running row with the Portuguese official that eventually saw her docked a game.In an interview with Australia’s Channel Ten, the American superstar said a male player would not have been treated the same way.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissShe said women could not get away with “even half of what a guy can do”.“Right now we are not, as it’s proven, in that same position,” she said in an interview that aired late Sunday. “I asked him ‘what are you talking about you were coaching?’,” she said.“We don’t have signals, we’ve never had signals. He said he made a motion, and I said ‘OK so you made a motion and now you’re telling people you were coaching me?’.“That doesn’t make sense. Why would you say that?”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil LATEST STORIES Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “But that’s neither here nor there. I’m just trying most of all to recover from that and move on.”Williams said she felt “on the cusp of this amazing moment” before the 6-2, 6-4 loss to Osaka.A win would have taken her to 24 Grand Slams, equalling Australian Margaret Court’s all-time record.The dispute with Ramos began when Williams was issued a warning for coaching, something her coach sitting in the player’s box, Patrick Mouratoglou, admitted to doing.Williams said she had not seen the Frenchman make a gesture and labelled his subsequent admission “a really confusing moment”.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img

Read More

January 18, 2020 | by

LFA Refutes Players’ Bonus Dispute

first_imgThe Liberia Football Association (LFA) has denied reports that two foreign-based players, Sekou Jabateh and Alseny Keita, clashed with Liberia FA President Musa Bility over bonuses before the 1-0 victory over Lesotho on Sunday.LFA General Secretary Alphonso Amah said the reports were false and misleading, adding that no such incident occurred prior to the Lesotho encounter at the Antoinette Tubman Stadium in Monrovia.“No players complained as to what was allotted for them, including the two overseas players Sekou Jabateh and Alseny Keita,” he pointed out.The LFA chief scribe revealed that each foreign-based player received US$500 while home-based players got US$250.“At no time [did] LFA President Musa Bility clash with Sekou Jabateh and Alseny Keita over money issues. The news is only intended to damage the good work of Bility’s administration,” he stressed.A local sports newspaper, Champions Sports, claimed on Monday that LFA President Musa Bility and two foreign-based players clashed over bonuses before the match with Lesotho.On Sunday, it finished 1-0 to Liberia at home in the African Cup of nations qualifier against Lesotho at Antoinette Tubman Stadium (ATS) in Monrovia. Liberian skipper and midfielder Anthony Laffor grabbed the only goal of the game. Laffor, who plays for South African side Super Sports, struck five minutes before half time.The Liberians will take a slim lead to Maseru for the return leg.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img

Read More

January 18, 2020 | by

Cuttington University Celebrates 129th Anniversary

first_imgSome Cuttington alumni and honorees at the university’s 129th anniversary celebrationDedicates 10 departments to 10 visionariesCuttington University on Thursday, February 22, celebrated the 129th anniversary of its founding by recognizing the great work that its founders, including Bishop Samuel D. Ferguson, put in place to establish the first private institution of higher learning in Liberia.It was an occasion that assembled a good number of alumni, faculty, students, and Bong County officials, including the Vice President of Liberia, Jewel Howard Taylor, and the  Superintendent of Bong County, Madam Esther Walker.Established in Cape Palmas, Maryland County in 1889, Cuttington was named after Robert Fulton Cutting, treasurer of the Episcopal Church USA, who two years earlier donated $5000 for the establishment of a school for children. At the time, it was Bishop Samuel D. Ferguson, the first black bishop of the Episcopal Church and of the Liberian Diocese, who on February 22, 1889, established the Cuttington Collegiate and Divinity School. The school was forced to close down in 1929, due to financial and other reasons, but was re-opened in 1949 during the tenure of the late Bishop Bravid W. Harris as a four-year co-educational Liberal Arts College, and re-named Cuttington College and Divinity School at its new home in Suacoco, Bong County.Celebrated under the theme, ‘We Are One,’ many, including and former Education Minister Evelyn Kandakai, former University of Liberia President Dr. Emmett A. Dennis, eminent Liberian historian, Dr. D. Elwood Dunn, and Daily Observer Publisher Kenneth Y. Best, remembered the wisdom that has guided the CU for the last 129 years: ‘Sancte et Sapiente,’ a Latin expression which means: “Holy and Wise.”The major highlight of the festivities was the naming of 10 Cuttington University colleges and departments in honor of many who made outstanding contributions to the institution and set it apart internationally.The university’s Graduation Hall (also known as the ‘G-Stand’) was named in memory of the late Bishop Samuel D. Ferguson, founder of Cuttington.  The Bishop Ferguson family was represented by Counselor Seward M. Cooper and Dr. Ophelia Inez Cooper, great grandson and great granddaughter, respectively, of Bishop Ferguson.A cross section of the audience at the Cuttington University 129th anniversary celebrationThe College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences was named in honor of Drs. John and Judy Gay. Mr. Kenneth Y. Best, representing the couple who said they were now too old to travel, in a carefully worded speech said Dr. John Gay, as dean of academic affairs (1958-60), raised the standard of Cuttington and “made it an even tougher academic institution. He and his wife Judy and Cuttington as a whole impacted not only Liberians but students from many parts of Africa, including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and many in Southern Africa,” Best said. They included Ochieng Adala (Kenya), Kenneth’s classmate who graduated in 1963, Paul Rupia, Class of 1960, Ghisla Mapunda, Ngombale and Kisenge, all from Tanzania, many of whom held prominent government positions on return home.  Ochieng became Kenyan Ambassador to Egypt; while Paul Rupia was a close associate of Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere.Though he was studying Agriculture at Cuttington, Mr. Best said Providence had decided his fate when in July 1961, Judy asked him to serve as an editor of the Cuttington Review, a literary magazine that featured articles on drama, essays, poems and short stories.Best noted that he was yet a sophomore in 1961 when the request came. “That’s a senior’s job,” he replied, and was told that the senior who was in charge had returned to Tanzania.Judy said, “I know you can do it and I am here to guide you.” Best said he accepted the challenge and ran the Review successfully until graduation in 1963.The Cuttington Review, Mr. Best told his audience, was the first to publish the works, essays and short stories, by Wilton Sankawulo, one of his classmates, who became a prolific writer while yet at Cuttington.  Wilton, who graduated along with Kenneth on December 2, 1963, went on to produce many books of short stories and novels that have been taught in Liberian schools for decades.Dr. Kandakai (right) and othersIn what he described as a confession, Best revealed that “It was the Cuttington Review that ushered me into journalism and landed me in my first professional job in March 1964, spearheaded by none other than President William V. S. Tubman.”Mr. Kenneth Y. Best, who represented Dr. John and Judy GrayMr. Best recommended to CU Administration to revive the Cuttington Review and promised support from the management of the Liberian Observer Corporation, publishers of the Daily Observer, presently under the managing directorship of his son Bai Sama Gwenning Best.  He also urged President Herman Browne to restore to the Cuttington campus read more

Read More

January 14, 2020 | by

Mayor rejects notion she planned breakfast

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – While it has been advertised as the Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast, the faith-based event is sort of between names. Santa Clarita Mayor Marsha McLean, among the scheduled speakers, said Monday she wants to avoid the impression that it is her event, although she will be speaking at it. So an apostrophe has been eliminated, and the event advertised as the Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast has also been called the Mayors Prayer Breakfast – politically correct, perhaps, but grammatically suspect. “This is a breakfast put on by a business group, and I was invited to speak,” McLean said. “Now this business group can invite whomever they wish and the content is up to them. I have nothing to do with it.” The description of the event as the “Mayors Prayer Breakfast” has been used in invitations under a “Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast” letterhead. That is because it was too late to change the graphics on the letterhead, said organizer Joe Messina, a businessman with the Dunamis Group, a Christian organization. McLean said the new name is meant to include mayors of other cities who participate in prayer breakfasts. alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

Read More

January 11, 2020 | by

NASHVILLE STAR COLLEEN SET FOR MOUNT ERRIGAL HOTEL GIG

first_imgSHE’S a star in the home of country Nashville – now Colleen Lloy is coming to County Donegal.She’s coming back to the Emerald Isle as part of a European tour – and will be on stage at the Mount Errigal Hotel on August 20.Lloy was in Ireland in June and has booked a show at the Mount Errigal Hotel as part of The Gathering Celebration and to trace her family roots. Colleen’s recent tour included stops in Italy, Austria, Ireland, and England but she was so fond of Ireland that she booked a show for August 20th at the Mount Errigal Hotel.Colleen Lloy has shared the stage with music greats like George Jones, BB King, Tanya Tucker, Billy Ray Cyrus, John Anderson, Paul Overstreet, John Berry, Lee Greenwood and most recently Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac.Said Lloy: “I am so excited to be playing the Mount Errigal Hotel Ballroom and to be coming back to Ireland again!“I love the people of Ireland and the scenery in Donegal is just incredible.” She has local recording artist, Paul Tully opening the show for her.Paul is a local from Strabane who returned after briefly living in Australia while pursuing his music. Paul fronts the successful rock band Pontius Pilots and has an EP coming out in September. When Lloy heard his voice she had to have him open the show. “He has a golden voice and is definitely a star on the rise.”Tickets at €12 can be purchased at the Mount Errigal Hotel lobby or by calling 353 (0) 7491 22700 or you can get more information on the website at http://www.mounterrigal.com. You can also purchase tickets at Mahon Engineering on Dock Street in Strabane priced £10.The doors open at 8:00 pm and the show starts at 8:30 pmVisit http://www.colleenlloy.com for more information about Colleen Lloy and her complete tour schedule. NASHVILLE STAR COLLEEN SET FOR MOUNT ERRIGAL HOTEL GIG was last modified: August 9th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Colleen LloyletterkennyMount Errigal Hotellast_img

Read More

December 25, 2019 | by

LyIT graduate cooks up Champions League storm and savours famous win

first_imgA Letterkenny Institute of Technology tourism graduate was part of the official Liverpool staff for the Champions League final at the weekend.Manorhamilton native Gabriel McSharry is employed as a senior chef de partie at Liverpool, based at the club’s Melwood training complex.Gabriel was in Madrid at the weekend with Jürgen Klopp’s squad for the 2-0 win over Tottenham Hotspur as the Reds won their sixth European Cup. Gabriel is a graduate of LyIT’s Killybegs campus, where he competed a degree in Culinary Arts.LyIT graduate cooks up Champions League storm and savours famous win was last modified: June 10th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Champions League FinalGabriel McSharryJurgen KloppLiverpoolLYITmadridManorhamiltonTottenham Hotspurlast_img

Read More

December 21, 2019 | by

Bengals 30, Raiders 16: Takeaways from another ugly loss

first_imgCINCINNATI — A tumultuous week for the Raiders ended in form, a 30-16 loss to the mediocre Bengals capping off a seven-day stretch that started with Reggie McKenzie losing his job as general manager.In between came a lawsuit filed by the City of Oakland against the Raiders for their impending move to Vegas, the organization’s withdrawal of a proposed lease agreement for the Oakland Coliseum next season, Amari Cooper saying Jon Gruden didn’t want to trade him and the NFL suspending Martavis …last_img

Read More

December 21, 2019 | by

Miller-Urey Spark Discharge Experiment Resurrected

first_imgTechnicians provide detailed instructions how to spark gases to make amino acids without causing explosions in the lab.PhysOrg published a press release from the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JOVE) titled, “A 21st Century Adaptation of the Miller-Urey Origin of Life Experiments: A safe approach to investigating how organic molecules could come about from inorganic compounds.”  The article includes a video with a step-by-step instructions for adding ammonia, methane and nitrogen safely to water in a flask and sparking it with a Tesla coil, then retrieving the products for spectral analysis.  Listed in the products is a racemic mixture of a dozen amino acids.The public may not have heard that the experiment is dangerous:“Miller was hesitant to encourage people to repeat the experiment due to the risk of inducing an explosion,” said Parker, explaining why his lab chose to publish their version of the experiment in JoVE’s signature step-by-step video format. “Often times, after reading a methods description it may not be fully clear how a certain research task was carried out,” he said, “…Therefore, this article was written to inform interested researchers how to conduct the experiment safely, in part, by giving precise instructions on evacuating [ignitable gasses like oxygen, methane and hydrogen from] the reaction apparatus before initiating the spark.“A simplified procedure was designed at the University of Georgia then shown on video.  Assisting the design was one of Miller’s students, Jeffrey Bada, who went on to continue origin of life experiments at Scripps.  Earlier, Bada had also retrieved and analyzed some of Miller’s original samples (PhysOrg, 3/21/11).As usual, the article links the spark-discharge apparatus to ideas about life arising spontaneously from chemicals, the so-called “building blocks of life.”  It states, “The Miller-Urey experiment was a pioneering study regarding the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds with possible relevance to the origins of life.”  Later experiments noted a number of problems with it, however (see 5/02/03), including an unrealistic mixture of starting gases (12/03/04), causing Miller to modify his apparatus substantially in later experiments (10/31/02).  Not even Bada believes it was relevant to the origin of life (6/14/02), though he looks back at the Miller experiment as useful for having turned primordial soup research into a “respectable science.”Problems notwithstanding, the Miller-Urey experiment had a profound psychological effect on millions of students (it is still illustrated in many biology textbooks).  In the book and film The Case for a Creator, for instance, Lee Strobel described how hearing about this experiment in high school effectively switched off any lingering belief in God and turned him into an atheist (see segment on YouTube).  Biologist Jonathan Wells dealt with problems in the experiment in his book Icons of Evolution (see review on Evolution News & Views, June 2011).  Today’s origin-of-life researchers don’t play with sparks very often.  They battle between two opposing camps – “metabolism-first” (2/15/07), which looks for cyclic reactions mainly at deep sea vents, and “genetics first” (1/26/08) which theorizes an “RNA world” becoming more information-rich over time, only later co-opting proteins.  Sixty years after Miller’s experiments, origin of life research still faces daunting problems (12/31/13).What’s wrong with explosions?  They should welcome an explosion in the lab.  Evolutionists love explosions: the big bang, meteor impacts, the Cambrian explosion…  just think of all the energy dissipation that could fuel the emergence of organization within the apparatus.One striking thing that becomes apparent in the video is the high degree of intelligent design required to run the spark-discharge experiment.  The lab technician (a glazed-eyed student with all the personality of a robot) has to read meters, measure ingredients, and turn stopcocks in a specific order.  He uses highly purified distilled water.  Everything must be sterilized before use.  How realistic is that?  It’s a living illustration of the old cartoon with the scientist in the white lab coat saying, “If I can only create life here in the lab, it will prove that no intelligence was necessary to create life in the beginning.”The only good that could be done with a resurrection of the Miller experiment would be to expose it for the fraud it is.  The narrator should point out all the flaws, by saying, “Of course, Miller chose the wrong gases; few scientists believe today that methane, ammonia, and hydrogen were present on the early earth; but if more realistic gases are used in the experiment, no amino acids are produced, and if any oxygen is present, products are rapidly destroyed.”  The narrator should add, “It is obvious that a great deal of care and design is required read more

Read More

December 19, 2019 | by

Librarian saves ancient African manuscripts in Timbuktu

first_imgWhen al-Qaida invaded the historic city of Timbuktu, Malian librarian Abdel Kader Haidara worked under the cover of night to save thousands of ancient manuscripts – documenting African knowledge in astronomy, poetry, religion and science – from the extremists. The bravery of Abdel Kader Haidara and his colleagues in the Timbuktu Library Association helped prevent the destruction of the city’s 400 000 ancient manuscripts. (Image: The Library of Congress)• African folklore explored in animated short film• Kenya’s take on Adele’s “Hello”• African history gets animation treatment• Infographic: Africa’s best brands• New video game developed in Africa Priya PitamberThe story of Abdel Kader Haidara, a book collector and librarian from Timbuktu in Mali reads more like a classic spy novel than an academic work.When African affiliates of the Islamic militant group al-Qaida occupied his city in April 2012, he began to fear for the content of libraries and depositories which housed thousands of ancient Arabic manuscripts. So he set up a meeting with his colleagues in the Timbuktu Library Association.“We need to take out the manuscripts from the big buildings and disperse them around the city to family houses,” he told them, as he recalled later in an interview with the Wall Street Journal (WSJ). “We don’t want them finding the collections of manuscripts and stealing them or destroying them.”Serendipitously, Haidara had already received a grant of US$12 000 (about R179 000) from the Lagos branch of the Ford Foundation to study English at Oxford. With the manuscripts under threat, he asked if he could use the funds to protect them instead.He managed to recruit people all over the city, including family members. What happened next was a heist worthy of the Hollywood blockbuster Ocean’s Eleven.Haidara and his team bought 50 to 80 metal and wooden trunks a day, and identified possible safe houses around the city and its outskirts, and in the Malian capital of Bamako. During the nights, they quietly packed valuable books and manuscripts into trunks, and transported the items by donkey and cart to safe places.In eight months, Haidara’s efforts saved countless documents. They braved al-Qaida checkpoints, and Malian soldiers in government-controlled areas. When French troops entered in January 2013, it was discovered that radicals had only managed to destroy a fraction of manuscripts – about 4 000 out of nearly 400 000.“If we hadn’t acted,” Haidara said, “I’m almost 100% certain that many, many others would have been burned.”Haidara’s own collection of manuscripts is kept at the Mamma Haidara Commemorative Library. It includes a Quran dating back to the 12th century, the script written on fish skin parchment and decorated with droplets of gold. His rich manuscript collection covers subjects as diverse as astronomy, poetry, mathematics, occult sciences and medicine. Some of the manuscripts date back to the 12th century, when Timbuktu was a vibrant trading post and a centre of knowledge. (Image: Wikipedia)‘Fragile cultural heritage’In 2014 Germany awarded the librarian with the German Africa Prize for his work to preserve Africa’s cultural heritage.“It isn’t about me personally,” Haidara told Deutsche Welle, a German international broadcaster, when the award was announced.“I only played my role. We know how important and how fragile cultural heritage is. Once a manuscript has been destroyed it is lost forever.”He said his devotion to the cause is not for himself, and not only for Mali, but for all of humanity.“This is a huge honour, not only for me, but for the all people who worked with me as well,” he said. “It is a big honour for our country Mali. It makes me very proud.”Africa’s rich written historyA few of the oldest Timbuktu manuscripts date as far back as the 11th and 12th centuries, when the city was a vibrant trading post, a place where scholars met to document their discourses. After Mali gained independence from France in 1960, the world found out about the rich, recorded history.“A lot of people were surprised because they had been told, even at school, that there were no written African historical records,” Haidara explained. “But we have hundreds of thousands of these documents in Arabic and in African languages.”Timbuktu was once a centre of Islamic scholarships under African empires, according to National Geographic. The city had an estimated 25 000 universities and madrasahs that “served as wellsprings for the spread of Islam throughout Africa from the 13th to 16th centuries”.Preserving the manuscriptsThe Ford Foundation, the German foreign office, Unesco and other interested parties are active in preserving the manuscripts. The foundation is also helping to find proper storage facilities, repairing the fragile documents, and having the collection digitised.See more about the work being done to preserve the ancient read more

Read More

December 18, 2019 | by

Early birth registration ensures access to basic services

first_img(Image: Isaiais Bartolomeu, Pixabay)Polokwane, Wednesday 31 August 2016 – Brand South Africa’s programme to showcase the competitiveness of the province of Limpopo, saw media today visiting the Seshego Hospital where they had first-hand experience of the early registration of birth process being implemented by the Department of Home Affairs.This is described by the Province’s MEC for Health, Dr Phophi Ramathuba as the “first legal acknowledgement of a child’s existence.” In addition, the registration of births is fundamental to the enabling citizens to access a number of services provided by government and other entities .Addressing the media – MEC Ramathuba said early birth registration ensures that children are provided with access to health care, access to immunisation, and that it ensures children enroll in school at the right age.Dr Ramathuba said: “In addition to issues relating to protection, a functioning system of birth and civil registration ensures that the country has an up-to-date and reliable database for planning. This is as useful for national level planning as it is for local government bodies that are responsible for maintaining education, health and other social services for the community.”Implemented by the Department of Home Affairs, the birth registration aims to ensure that individuals can be assured the legitimacy and authenticity of civil status.The Department of Home Affairs’ Chief Director for Birth, Marriages, and Death Dr Aaron Ramodumo explained that”Without birth registration and documentation, children may have problems proving their links to a state, which puts them at risk of becoming stateless. It is through our footprint extension into health facilities that we can achieve 100% birth registration within the prescribed 30 days. We desperately need assistance to trace mothers who leave before birth could be registered. It is a constitutional right of every child to a name and nationality from birth.”Brand South Africa, in partnership with the Departments of Trade and Industry, Provincial Health Department Home Affairs, the Industrial Development Corporation and the National Research Foundation are currently hosting a media in Polokwane, Limpopo where elements of the province’s competitiveness are being showcased. The media tour began on Tuesday 30 August and will coonclude on Thursday 01 September 2016.This comes within the context of Brand South Africa’s mandate to positively position South Africa’s competitiveness. Provincial and city brands are the building blocks of the Nation Brand. Competitive strengths of provinces and cities therefore impact positively on the South African Nation Brand.Follow the conversation on #ExperienceSAlast_img

Read More

December 18, 2019 | by